what is broadband wireless


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what is broadband wireless? Broadband wireless is about bringing the broadband experience
to a wireless context, which offers users certain unique benefits and convenience. There are
two fundamentally different types of broadband wireless services. The first type attempts to provide
a set of services similar to that of the traditional fixed-line broadband but using wireless as
the medium of transmission. This type, called fixed wireless broadband, can be thought of as a
competitive alternative to DSL or cable modem. The second type of broadband wireless, called
mobile broadband, offers the additional functionality of portability, nomadicity,1 and mobility.
Mobile broadband attempts to bring broadband applications to new user experience scenarios
and hence can offer the end user a very different value proposition. WiMAX (worldwide interoperability
for microwave access) technology,
Re: what is broadband wireless?

Broadband comes from the words “broad bandwidth” and is used to describe a high-capacity, two-way link between an end user and access network suppliers capable of supporting full-motion, interactive video applications.

Broadband in telecommunications is a term that refers to a signaling method that includes or handles a relatively wide range of frequencies, which may be divided into channels or frequency bins. Broadband is always a relative term, understood according to its context. The wider the bandwidth, greater is the information carrying capacity. In radio, for example, a very narrow-band signal will carry Morse code; a broader band will carry speech; a still broader band is required to carry music without losing the high audio frequencies required for realistic sound reproduction. A television antenna described as “normal” may be capable of receiving a certain range of channels; one described as “broadband” will receive more channels. In data communications a modem will transmit a bandwidth of 64 kilobits per seconds (kbit/s) over a telephone line; over the same telephone line a bandwidth of several megabits per second can be handled by ADSL, which is described as broadband (relative to a modem over a telephone line, although much less than can be achieved over a fibre optic circuit

A class of communication channel capable of supporting a wide range of frequencies, typically from audio up to video frequencies. A broadband channel can carry multiple signals by dividing the total capacity into multiple, independent bandwidth channels, where each channel operates only on a specific range of frequencies. The term has come to be used for any kind of Internet connection with a download speed of more than 56 kbps, usually some kind of Digital Subscriber Line, e.g. ADSL. A broadband connection is typically always connected, in contrast to a dial-up connection, and a fixed monthly rate is charged, often with a cap on the total amount of data that can be transferred. Domestic broadband connections typically share a telephone line with normal voice calls and the two uses can occur simultaneously without interference.

Broadband Internet access, often shortened to just “broadband”, is high speed Internet access—typically contrasted with dial-up access over modem. Dial-up modems are generally only capable of a maximum bitrate of 56 kbit/s (kilobits per second) and require the full use of a telephone line—whereas broadband technologies supply at least double this speed and generally without disrupting telephone use.


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