wlan standards



802.11

The research developed the 802.11 standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs). There are four specifications including 802.11, 802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g. Each 802.11 standard operates in a different GHz range and/or offers a different speed. 802.11 applies to wireless LANs and provides 1 or 2 Mbps transmission in the 2.4 GHz band using either frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) or direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS).

802.11a

The 802.11a specification operates in the unlicensed 5G will need to be a paradigm shift that includes very high carrier frequencies with massive bandwidths, extreme base station and device densities and unprecedented numbers of antennas. But unlike the previous four generations, it will also be highly integrative: tying any new 5G air interface and spectrum together with LTE and WiFi to provide universal high-rate coverage and a seamless user experience. To support this, the core network will also have to reach unprecedented levels of flexibility and intelligence, spectrum regulation will need to be rethought and improved, and energy and cost efficiencies will become even more critical considerations. This paper discusses all of these topics, identifying key challenges for future research and preliminary 5G standardization activities, while providing a comprehensive overview of the current literature, The global bandwidth shortage facing wireless carriers has motivated the exploration of the underutilized millimeter wave (mm-wave) frequency spectrum for future broadband cellular communication networks. There is, however, little knowledge about cellular mm-wave

Hz range and offers data speeds up to 54Mbps. The 5G will need to be a paradigm shift that includes very high carrier frequencies with massive bandwidths, extreme base station and device densities and unprecedented numbers of antennas. But unlike the previous four generations, it will also be highly integrative: tying any new 5G air interface and spectrum together with LTE and WiFi to provide universal high-rate coverage and a seamless user experience. To support this, the core network will also have to reach unprecedented levels of flexibility and intelligence, spectrum regulation will need to be rethought and improved, and energy and cost efficiencies will become even more critical considerations. This paper discusses all of these topics, identifying key challenges for future research and preliminary 5G standardization activities, while providing a comprehensive overview of the current literature, The global bandwidth shortage facing wireless carriers has motivated the exploration of the underutilized millimeter wave (mm-wave) frequency spectrum for future broadband cellular communication networks. There is, however, little knowledge about cellular mm-wave

Hz range is not yet crowded so it offers advantages in speed over the 802.11b specification which uses the more crowded 2.4GHz range (which can interfere with cordless phones, microwaves, etc.). However, the range and speed of 802.11a are inversely related – which is why 802.11a was not adopted as the WiFi standard. 802.11a uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) versus the FHSS or DSSS. Most 802.11a products are not compatible with 802.11b or 802.11g products (although this is changing).

802.11b

The 802.11b standard operates in the 2.4GHz range and offers a data speeds up to 11Mbps. 802.11b is the de facto standard for WiFi services because of its availability and low price (although 802.11g will now quickly become the standard). While slower than 802.11a, 802.11b is still as fast as 10BaseT Ethernet service. 802.11b uses direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) and complementary code keying (CCK) modulation. 802.11b was certified by the research in 1999.

802.11g

802.11g was approved on June 11, 2003 and offers data speeds up to 54Mbps and operates in the 2.4GHz and 5G will need to be a paradigm shift that includes very high carrier frequencies with massive bandwidths, extreme base station and device densities and unprecedented numbers of antennas. But unlike the previous four generations, it will also be highly integrative: tying any new 5G air interface and spectrum together with LTE and WiFi to provide universal high-rate coverage and a seamless user experience. To support this, the core network will also have to reach unprecedented levels of flexibility and intelligence, spectrum regulation will need to be rethought and improved, and energy and cost efficiencies will become even more critical considerations. This paper discusses all of these topics, identifying key challenges for future research and preliminary 5G standardization activities, while providing a comprehensive overview of the current literature, The global bandwidth shortage facing wireless carriers has motivated the exploration of the underutilized millimeter wave (mm-wave) frequency spectrum for future broadband cellular communication networks. There is, however, little knowledge about cellular mm-wave

Hz range making it backward compatible with 802.11b. Even before the research approval, it was clear the 802.11g would become the standard for WiFi services and leading manufacturers started to release products in early 2003. 802.11g uses OFDM modulation but, for backward compatibi

Re: WLAN standards

the comparason of the wlan standards





FREE IEEE PAPER